‘White Widow’ Samantha Lewthwaite feared to be planning more attacks

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Police fear Samantha Lewthwaite – the fugitive Brit dubbed the ‘White Widow’ – is planning more terror attacks, after documents found on her laptop linked her to the Nairobi mall massacre.

The laptop seized in Kenya in 2011 contained documents that revealed the British suspect had been plotting to target a mall in Kenya’s capital for at least two years.

The computer showed Lewthwaite had carried out detailed research on how to make bombs and explosives.

“The international security community is working round the clock to identify her whereabouts and capture her without delay,” a source said.

“The lives of hundreds, if not thousands, of innocent people are at risk if she is able to launch an attack. She needs to be stopped in her tracks before it is too late.

“She is a danger to the world.”

Authorities think Lewthwaite had probably been planning an attack on a different mall in 2011, but realised her plan last month at Westgate shopping centre where at least 67 people were murdered in cold blood.

Lewthwaite, 29, who is nicknamed White Widow because she was married to the 2005 London bombings suicide bomber Jermaine Lindsay, has been dubbed the world’s most wanted woman after the Westgate atrocity.

She has been in hiding since December 2011 after police linked her and fellow Briton Jermaine Grant, 30, to a foiled bombing plot against Western tourists in Kenya.

The White Widow was made the subject of a high-alert Red Notice by Interpol after being linked to the massacre.

Police sources have revealed for the first time that there is “specific intelligence” that puts Lewthwaite at the heart of at least six separate bomb plots in Kenya.

One was a grenade attack on a sports bar in Mombasa last year when a little boy was killed.

 

Boko Haram gunmen storm a college dormitory and fire on sleeping students.

Boko Haram gunmen have stormed a college dormitory in Nigeria’s conflict-scarred north-east, firing on students as they slept.

Unconfirmed reports say more than 20 students were killed in the early morning attack on the College of Agriculture in the town of Gujba in Yobe state.

Area military spokesman Lazarus Eli said it was carried out by “Boko Haram terrorists who went into the school and opened fire on students,” while they were sleeping.

Security forces were at the scene but details on the number of dead and injured were not yet available, he said.

Gujba is roughly 30 kilometres from the state capital of Damaturu.

A police source, who requested anonymity, said that initial reports indicated the death toll could be high but he was not prepared to discuss figures.

A hospital source in the Yobe state capital Damaturu, who asked not to be named, told Reuters that 26 bodies had been brought in from the scene of the attack.

Yobe has seen a series of brutal attacks targeting students in recent months, all blamed on Boko Haram.

The worst occurred in July in the town of Mamudo, where the Islamists threw explosives and sprayed gunfire into dormitories, killing at least 42 people, mostly students.

The name Boko Haram means ‘Western education is forbidden’ and the group has repeatedly attacked schools, universities and colleges through its four-year insurgency.

During Jihadists’ Kenyan Mall Massacre, Jihad Flag Was Flying Proudly Over The Streets Of New York City

Socialism is not the Answer

Western Journalism

At the same time as devout Muslims were separating Muslim children from non-Muslim children and executing them in cold blood in an upscale mall in Kenya, Muslims marched down Madison Avenue under the flag of jihad (the same flag the Muslims in Kenya were killing under.)

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Thrown Out Of Egypt, The Muslim Brotherhood Moves Office… To London

PA Pundits - International

PamelaGellerAuthorImageBy Pamela Geller ~0723-egypt-muslim-brotherhood-protests_full_600

Where are terrorists comfortable and free to set up house? London, terror central. Imagine this, after Egypt banned the Brotherhood, they moved….. to London. Not Kabul, Qatar or Khartoum. London. But Robert Spencer and I are banned from entering because it might not be “conducive to the public good.” Savages agree.

“The Muslim Brotherhood moves office… to London” Trending Central, September 24, 2013 (thanks to Dave H)

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has decided to move its media offices to London, following a Cairo court decision to proscribe the Islamist entity’s activities and any subsidiary institution related to it.

The Brotherhood already maintains a London presence through which it was previously running the administrative affairs of the organisation. The London headquarters is a “research centre” headed by Ibrahim Mounir, former member of the Guidance Bureau and former Secretary General of the international organisation of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Al-Shabab, The Somali Islamic extremist group: What you should know about them.

Here are 10 things to know about al-Shabab, the Somali Islamic extremist group that has claimed responsibility for an attack on a Kenyan shopping mall.

WHAT IS AL-SHABAB?
Al-Shabab is an extremist Islamic terrorist force that grew out of the anarchy that crippled Somalia after warlords ousted a longtime dictator in 1991. Its name means “The Youth” in Arabic, and it was a splinter youth wing of a weak Islamic Courts Union government created in 2006 to establish a fundamentalist Islamic state in the East African nation.
Al-Shabab is estimated to have several thousand fighters, including a few hundred foreign fighters. Some of the insurgents’ foreign fighters are from the Middle East with experience in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. Others are young, raw recruits from Somali communities in the United States and Europe. US officials have expressed fears that militants fleeing Afghanistan and Pakistan could seek refuge in Somalia.
Somalia Americans in Jihad

WHERE IS AL-SHABAB?

Al-Shabab won control of almost all of Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu, in 2006, and held large swathes of central and southern Somalia until a United Nations-backed force from the African Union, including soldiers from neighbouring Kenya and Uganda, pushed the militants out of the city in 2011 and out of the vital port of Kismayo in 2012.
The rebels still control many rural areas in Somalia where it imposes strict Shariah law, including stoning to death women accused of adultery and amputating the hands of accused thieves. In addition it has staged deadly suicide bomb attacks on Mogadishu and Kismayo.

HOW MANY FIGHTERS DOES IT HAVE?

No one knows for sure, but al-Shabab is believed to command thousands of fighters including hundreds of foreigners.

WHY ARE THEY ATTACKING KENYA?
Al-Shabab has warned for two years that it will attack Kenya in retaliation for the country’s leading role in sending troops to Somalia in 2011 and effectively reducing the extremist group’s power in Somalia.
Al-Shabab also claimed responsibility for the July 2010 suicide bombings in Kampala, Uganda, that killed more than 70 people watching a World Cup final soccer match at a restaurant popular among foreigners. Ugandan troops also are fighting in the African force in Somalia.
The group has staged ongoing major attacks within Somalia for years.

AL-QAIDA LINKS?

Al-Shabab and al-Qaida in February 2012 announced their alliance, with al-Shabab leader Mukhtar Abu Zubair pledging allegiance to the global terror movement. Al-Qaida’s 2002 attacks on an Israeli-owned Kenyan resort in Mombasa and an attempted attack on a plane carrying Israeli tourists are believed to have been planned by an al-Qaida cell in Somalia.
US officials believe some of the al-Qaida terrorists who bombed the United States embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998 were given refuge in Somalia.

WHERE DOES AL-SHABAB’S MONEY COME FROM?
Before African troops moved in, al-Shabab was making a steady income from duties and fees levied at ports and airports as well as extorting taxes on domestic produce and demanding “jihadi” contributions.
A United Nations report estimated al-Shabab’s income in 2011 at between $70 million and $100 million. It has lost most of that revenue since it was forced out of Mogadishu and Kismayo. Al-Shabab’s only ally in Africa is Eritrea – which backs it to counter its enemy Ethiopia, which also has troops in Somalia. Eritrea denies charges that it helps arm al-Shabab.

FRACTURED GROUP?

Al-Shabab is believed to have fractured over its alliance with al-Qaida, which caused a rift that has grown between core Shabab fighters who believe their struggle should focus on Somalia, and growing tensions with foreign fighters who want to plot a regional terrorist strategy.
Analysts think the attack on Nairobi’s Westgate mall could indicate the extremists are winning that internal struggle. Further divisions are believed to have been caused by the group’s decision to ban foreign aid organisations from operating in the country and providing food to save millions of victims of conflict-induced famine. That decision was announced in 2011, when the UN said Somalia had the world’s highest child mortality rate.

US ROLE IN THE FIGHT AGAINST AL-SHABAB?

The United States backed the first African intervention against al-Shabab, supporting Ethopian troops that invaded in 2006. Washington has given millions of dollars to support the UN-backed African force fighting al-Shabab, which it designated a foreign terrorist organization in 2008.
The intervention from Ethiopia, a longtime enemy of Somalia, is considered to have radicalised al-Shabab and perhaps pushed it into the arms of al-Qaida, according to the US-based Centre for Strategic and International Studies.

WHAT INSPIRES THEM?

Al-Shabab is inspired by the Saudi Arabian Wahabi version of Islam though most Somalis belong to the more moderate Sufi strain. While they initially won popularity with Somalis by promising security and stability after years of lawlessness and violence, al-Shabab’s destruction of Sufi shrines has cost them much support among locals.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR SOMALIA?

Somalia’s first elected government in more than two decades won power a year ago and, together with the African Union force, has the opportunity to create “a window of opportunity to fundamentally change Somalia’s trajectory,” according to the US State Department. Business is growing and even foreign oil companies are negotiating concessions at the most hopeful moment in decades for that failed state